Date of Award

Spring 5-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Film Studies

First Advisor

Emily Carman, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Kia Afra, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Erica Aguero, Ph.D.

Abstract

New Hollywood was foundationally a debatable period in the course of American film history, with distinctive characteristics of new directorial emergence and innovative film style. However, the contemporary industrial context suggested a prominent power of stardom to effectively sustain the business in the new wave of new youth and counterculture. In the inception of the period, Warner Bros., one of the major film studios since the classical Hollywood era, exemplified a star-driven marketing approach using classical glamour and the narrative of nonconformity to attract the target audience. Proven by the studio’s archival evidence, major Hollywood stars in the 1960s made extensive use of their established persona to reframe contemporary perception towards Hollywood stardom. Attributing star marketing power into New Hollywood studies not only complicates the traditional definition of New Hollywood, but also highlights its high cultural and commercial impacts on the Hollywood industry in the countercultural 1960s.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Available for download on Friday, May 14, 2021

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