Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

Document Type

Chapman access only Poster

Publication Date

Spring 5-2021

Faculty Advisor(s)

Caroline Wilson

Abstract

Inspired by the true story of a Chapman University professor diagnosed with a brain tumor, a teaching case study was developed to help students learn neurophysiology concepts based on Professor Eric’s experiences. After researching the underlying pathophysiology, the professor was interviewed, learning objectives were identified, and a class plan was outlined for an applied human neurophysiology course (AHP 430). The main objective was for students to apply the professor’s real-life symptoms to topics related to hearing, balance, cranial nerves, radiological imaging, and clinical complications. The case study was organized into a jigsawstyle format, where student teams worked on four different scenarios. Three scenarios explored different pathophysiology topics and/or subsequent surgical outcomes. The fourth scenario discussed neurocognitive complications caused by increased computer screen time due to online instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic. The case study was piloted with students in Spring 2021 at Chapman University. Student understanding was evaluated with a brief content assessment (Kahoot) to consider the efficacy of the case study format. Participating students were surveyed to gather insight regarding timing, content, and suggested improvements for the case. Most students (81%) rated the case 5/5 for enjoyment, commenting on the engaging narrative and the opportunity to work as a team. A majority (75%) also rated the effectiveness of the jigsaw-style approach 5/5, although some students felt they missed information presented in the other scenarios. The feedback was utilized to discuss and alter the case prior to submission for publication in the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. Professor Eric’s story offers a personalized “why” and “how” to help pre-health students establish the connection between pathophysiology and real-life symptoms. For this student author, developing the case also provided an immense personal connection to understanding her treasured mentor’s condition.

Comments

Presented at the virtual Spring 2021 Student Scholar Symposium at Chapman University.

This scholarship is part of the Chapman University COVID-19 Archives.

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