Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-2015

Abstract

Testing narrative engagement theory, this study examines student engagement and teachers’ spontaneous narratives told in a narrative-based drug prevention curriculum. The study describes the extent to which teachers share their own narratives in a narrative-based curriculum, identifies dominant narrative elements, forms and functions, and assesses the relationships among teacher narratives, overall lesson narrative quality, and student engagement. One-hundred videotaped lessons of the keepin’ it REAL drug prevention curriculum were coded and the results supported the claim that increased narrative quality of a prevention lesson would be associated with increased student engagement. The quality of narrativity, however, varied widely. Implications of these results for narrative-based prevention interventions and narrative pedagogy are discussed.

Comments

This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Language and Social Psychology, volume 34, issue 6, in 2015 following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at DOI: 10.1177/0261927X15586429.

Copyright

The authors

 
 

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